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Cruise wasn’t hiding the pedestrian-dragging video from regulators — it just had bad internet

Cruise autonomous vehicles
Photo by Tayfun Coskun / Anadolu via Getty Images

Cruise, the self-driving car subsidiary of General Motors, tried to send a 45-second video to regulators of an incident in which one of its driverless cars dragged a pedestrian 20 feet but was hampered by “internet connectivity issues,” according to a report compiled by a law firm investigating the incident.

The law firm, Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, was hired by Cruise to determine whether its executives misled regulators in the aftermath of the October 2nd incident in which a hit-and-run driver struck a pedestrian, knocking her into the path of a driverless Cruise vehicle. Its conclusions were detailed in a nearly 200-page report that was released today.

Cruise also disclosed for the first time that the incident was under…

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